Monthly Archives: March 1991

PDQ

The true believers already know the scene by heart. Monday night at the Pasadena Civic Auditorium, a few minutes past 8. A capacity crowd stirs in anticipation. The unitiated are a little restless, but the Believers know the order of events. A sleepy-eyed stage manager shuffles out, glowers at the crowd, blows into the microphone and […]

LAPO

Andrew Davis had already done well by the Los Angeles Philharmonic two months ago, in a regularly scheduled appearance as guest conductor. This week he has done even better, in a noble rescue operation. This week’s concerts at the Music Center, Beethoven’s Second Symphony and the Berlioz “Fantastic” Symphony, were slated as the program for […]

SCHOENBERG QT

Arnold Schoenberg liked to complain that his name wasn’t well enough known. He would have had a ball on Sunday afternoon, when the Schoenberg Quartet from The Netherlands played a Schoenberg quartet at UCLA’s Schoenberg Hall, with a contingent from U.S.C.’s Schoenberg Institute also in attendance. The group has played here before, most recently in […]

LAPO

It should have been better. Of all the cultural events around town relating to the County Museum’s “Degenerate Art” show, the Los Angeles Philharmonic’s concert on Thursday night (repeated tonight) turned out to be one of the more paltry components. Why? The programming itself was part of the problem; it seemed lazily conceived. To be […]

UMBRELLA

Ernst Krenek turned 90 last summer.He lives in Palm Springs, where he continues to compose. His opus numbers are, in fact, well into the high 200s. At Monday night’s Green Umbrella concert at the Japan America Theater, the sweep across Krenek’s music ran from Opus 58, of 1928, to 234, of 1981. Krenek has spent […]

LAPO

The phenomenon of Vladimir Ashkenazy brightens our musical landscape. Pianist and conductor, his mastery of both arts is truly remarkable. If anything, his prowess in the one area seems to nourish the other. He has been with us these two weeks in the latter capacity. On Wednesday he led the Los Angeles Philharmonic through a […]

POLLINI

The world is well supplied with promising pianists, accomplished pianists, even a few great pianists. Yet Maurizio Pollini stands apart, a musician of such towering intelligence and originality, coupled with with a virtuoso’s technique so close to flawless as anyone could hope from mortal fingers, that he seems to merit his own category. A cheering […]

MEC

Art for the ear, art for the eye: it made for a compelling mixture at the County Museum on Monday night. In the Bing Theater’s Monday Evening Concert series, an imaginatively arranged program formed a musical reflection of the “Degenerate Art” exhibition across the plaza at the Anderson Gallery. By a stroke of generous planning, […]

SUNDAYCOL

PAUL: I HAVE TO GIVE A LECTURE IN THE MORNING, IN AROUND NOON. HERE’S ANOTHER COPY OF MY SUNDAY COLUMN; I DON’T SEE WHERE ANY WORDS ARE MISSING UNLESS JON DID SOME EDITING> ANYHOW, I’LL SEE YOU LATER — ALAN [F/L] Paul Hillier, much respected for his recordings of early music with his Hilliard Ensemble, brings […]

LAPO

Cellists like to complain about the paucity of concertos for their instrument. And yet they have the Dvorak, and few concertos for any instrument are as rapturously beautiful as that supremely eloquent work. Lynn Harrell was the soloist in Dvorak’s concerto this past weekend, and Vladimir Ashkenazy conducted the Los Angeles Philharmonic. If there has […]